Posts about blogs

20 Most Popular Post on the Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog in 2018

These were the most popular (by number of page views) posts on our blog in 2018.

Red-tailed hawk with squirrel

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20 Most Popular Post on the Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog in 2017

These were the most popular (by number of page views) posts on our blog in 2017.

Diagram of solar energy project using molton salt

molten salt solar system diagram

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Hacker News Suggestions for Engineering Team Blogs

See this comment page on Hacker News suggestions for engineering team blogs. Some of the suggested blog:

Somehow the Hacker News discussion missed the Curious Cat Science and Engineering blog. It must be that we are not an “engineering team” blog.

Related: Science and Engineering BlogsCurious Cat Top Management Improvement BlogsCurious Cat Popular Software Testing Blogs

20 Most Popular Post on the Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog in 2016

These were the most popular (by number of page views) posts on our blog in 2016.

photo of John Hunter with snow covered mountain peaks in the background

John Hunter, Olympic National Park (where the mountain peaks are colder and covered in snow)

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20 Most Popular Post on Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog in 2015

These were the most popular (by number of page views) posts on our blog in 2015.

3d printed taco holder with tacos

Taco Shell Holder, Noah Hornberger had the idea during breakfast and printed a version to test the next day.

This list shows how popular old posts can remain over time. 12 of these were also in the top 20 in 2014, 8 are new to the list this year. 3 of those are 2015 posts, in 2014 1 post from 2014 made the top 20. The distribution over the years of publication of the posts in the list this year:

2015: 3

2012: 1
2011: 1
2010: 4
2009: 3
2008: 5
2007: 2

2005: 1

Quixperito – New Social Bookmarking Site

I have created a new social bookmarking site. The site is meant to highlight good content online and is moderated to remove low value and spam content. By developing a community of users that share interests in worthwhile content on a variety of topics I hope to create a useful resource for people.

The topics included now are limited to help focus on high value content and develop a community of users around various topics. Please join and participate. Without a community the value of the site is low. Currently there is a technology section that will be of interest to readers of this Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog.

Other sections include: science, investing and business.

If you are interested in helping build the community please join and participate. You can post your related articles and posts and find new readers for your content. And by voting on others posts you can help highlight posts that the community finds worth reading.

Related: Curious Cat science and engineering search enginescience and engineering links

Top Ranked Engineering Blog

I ran across another site that ranks this blog first for engineering, which I always like – even if I realize the ranking is just one computation and hardly definitive.

Google returns this blog 3rd in search results. Yahoo also has us 3rd (behind 2 different blogs than Google show). We are the 5th results on live search. The ranking on Top 100 Engineering Blogs slipped to 7th (they eliminated the subscriber factor from the calculation, and that hurt our ranking). We are the number one ranked engineering blog on blogged.

Related: #2 Engineering BlogBest Research University Rankings – 2008Curious Cat Science and Engineering SearchScience and Engineering blog directory

Bug of the Week: Leaf-footed Bug

Photo of leaf-footed bugPhoto of leaf-footed bug by Roberta

The Growing With Science Blog by Roberta, an entomologist, is full of interesting posts on bugs and more. For example – Bug of the Week: Leaf-footed Bug

We were doing a bit of yard work when we came across this leaf-footed bug. These insects get their name from the leaf-like flanges on their hind legs.Note the light-colored zig-zag marking across the middle of its back.

Leaf-footed bugs have sucking mouthparts and sometimes feed of fruit such as cactus fruit, oranges or peaches. Although we do have citrus, I think this one is a visitor from our neighbors’ yard. Our neighbors have a pomegranate bush. Pomegranates are one of the leaf-footed bugs’ favorite foods.

Like many of their relatives, these true bugs can give off an odor when handled.

🙂 I was adding in some related links and the first one, I was adding, Backyard Wildlife: Great Spreadwing Damselfly, Roberta had commented on to let me know it was a Great Spreadwing Damselfly. It is a small web.

Related: 2 Mysterious Species in the UKCool Looking Florescent Green Beetle: Six-spotted Tiger BeetleBig Spider

Read the Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog in 35 Languages

I have added a Google gadget to the right side column of the Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog that translates our blog into 35 languages. I have been proving a direct link to 6 languages, so this is a great increase in languages covered.

All that is required to add this capability to your site is add a short bit of javascript from the Google Translate gadget site. And as they add more languages that additional coverage will automatically be reflected on your site.

The usability of the Google translate is excellent, I think. If you are reading the translated page, say in Chinese, and you follow a link to another page on our site it translates that page for you automatically.

I hope you enjoy this new capability.

Related: Funding Google Gadget DevelopmentGoogle Offers $10 Million in Awards for Google Phone DevelopmentMarissa Mayer on Innovation at GoogleIs Google Overpriced?Javascript books

Post 2009

My first post in 2009 is the 2009th post for the blog. Here are some highlights from 2008:

HHMI on Science 2.0: Information Revolution

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute does great things for science and for open science. They have an excellent article in their HHMI Bulletin – Science 2.0: You Say You Want a Revolution?

Cross-pollination among research disciplines is in fact at the core of many other popular science blogs. Michael Eisen, an HHMI investigator at the University of California, Berkeley, is an avid blog reader who particularly enjoys John Hawks’ site on paleoanthropology, genetics, and evolution. A recent post there discussed a new sequencing of Neanderthal mitochondrial DNA. “It’s like a conduit into another whole world,” says Eisen.

The current extreme of collaboration via Science 2.0 is OpenWetWare.org. Begun in 2003 by Austin Che, who was then a computer science and biology graduate student at MIT, this biological-engineering Website uses the wiki model to showcase protocols and lab books: everything is open and can be edited by any of its 4,000 members.

“Most publishers wish open access would go away,” says Brown. It won’t. Major research-funding organizations, including NIH, HHMI, and the Wellcome Trust, now require their grantees to post their findings on openaccess Websites such as PLoS or PubMed Central within 12 months of publication in traditional journals. Publishers are pushing back, however, and in September, the House Judiciary Committee began holding hearings on whether the federal government should be allowed to require grantees to submit accepted papers to a free archive.

Related: $600 Million for Basic Biomedical Research from HHMITracking the Ecosystem Within UsPublishers Continue to Fight Open Access to Science$1 Million Each for 20 Science Educators

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