Currently browsing the Cats Category

Great posts about cats: Engineering a Camera for Your Cat - Treadmill Cats: Friday Cat Fun #3 - Origins of the Domestic Cat - And Now for Something Completely Different - Leopard Bests Crocodile

USA Designates Large Areas of New Mexico and Arizona as Critical Habitat for Jaguars

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated 764,200 acres of critical habitat for the jaguar (Panthera onca) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This habitat is found within Pima, Santa Cruz and Cochise counties in Arizona, and Hidalgo County in New Mexico.

The final rule reflects the following changes from the July 1, 2013, critical habit at proposal: exclusion of Tohono O’odham Nation lands (78,067 acres) as a result of the Tribe’s efforts working in partnership with the Service to conserve jaguar and other listed species’ habitat on the Nation’s sovereign land. Exemption of Fort Huachuca lands (15,867 acres) due to the conservation benefits to the jaguar provided in Fort Huachuca’s approved Integrated Natural Resource Management Plan.

The revised proposal was based on an updated habitat modeling report that more accurately reflected habitat essential to jaguars in northwestern Mexico and southwestern United States.

Mexico borderlands area is very different from habitat in Central and South America, where jaguars show a high affinity for lowland wet communities. Jaguars have been documented in arid areas of northwestern Mexico and southwestern United States, including thornscrub, desertscrub, lowland desert, mesquite grassland, Madrean oak woodland and pine oak woodland communities. Critical habitat in the United States contributes to the jaguar’s persistence and recovery across the species’ entire range by providing areas to support individuals that disperse into the United States from the nearest core population in Mexico.

Critical habitat is a term defined in the ESA and identifies geographic areas containing features essential to the conservation of a threatened or endangered species and that may require special management considerations or protection. The designation of critical habitat does not affect land ownership or establish a refuge, and has no impact on private landowners taking actions on their land that do not require federal funding or permits.

Related: Jaguars Back in the Southwest USA (2006 post)Big Cats in America (2004)Mountain Lions Returning to the Midwest USA for the First Time in a Century (2012)Backyard Wildlife: Mountain Lion

Continue reading

Skateboarding Cat

A fun way to start out the week: skateboarding cat.

Related: Friday Fun, Cat Playing Ping PongCat Using the DoorbellCats and Kids with iPads

Science Facts About Cats

Related: Domestic Cats Remain Successful PredatorsBackyard Wildlife: Mountain LionFriday Fun: Cats and Kids with iPads

Friday Fun: Cat Playing Ping Pong

Related: Robot Playing Table TennisMonkey and Kitten PlayingExercise Wheels for Dogs and CatsKindergarten Students Pedel Their Own Bus to School

Friday Fun: Gibbon Plays with Tiger Cubs

While this gibbon appears to be playing with the tiger cubs I am not sure the tigers see it as play.

Related: Monkey and Kitten PlayingFriday Fun: Kitten and BunnySumatran Tiger and Cubs Filmed by Remote Wildlife Monitoring CamerasCat and Crow Friends

Friday Fun: Kitten’s Curiosity Gets it Stuck and Mom Comes to Help

This kitten’s curiosity led it up a tree, but then it didn’t know what to do next. Mom comes to the rescue and kitten follows her lead.

Related: Kittens Being Rescued by Their MotherCat Goes to the Train Station to Meet Its Owner Each EveningCat ParkourTreadmill Cats

Domestic Cats Remain Successful Predators

House cats kill more critters than thought by Elizabeth Weise

While only 30% of roaming house cats kill prey — two animals a week on average — they are still slaying more wildlife than previously believed, according to research from the University of Georgia.

The cats brought home just under a quarter of what they killed, ate 30% and left 49% to rot where they died.

The carnage cuts across species. Lizards, snakes and frogs made up 41% of the animals killed, Loyd and fellow researcher Sonia Hernandez found. Mammals such as chipmunks and voles were 25%, insects and worms 20% and birds 12%.

Seeking a window into the hidden lives of cats, the researchers recruited 60 owners in the Athens, Ga., area. Each owner put a small video camera mounted on a break-away collar on the cat in the morning and let the cat out, then removed the camera and downloaded the footage each night.

Interesting data. As I wrote about before you can get your very own cat cam and see what your cat is up to. I posted an interview I did with the engineer that designs and sells the cat cams.

Related: Video Cat CameraPhotos by Fritz the CatSumatran Tiger and Cubs Filmed by Remote Wildlife Monitoring Cameras

Mountain Lions Returning to the Midwest USA for the First Time in a Century

Cougars Are Returning to the U.S. Midwest after More Than 100 Years by John Platt

Cougars once lived throughout most of the U.S. and Canada but state-sponsored bounties put in place to protect livestock and humans from what were often deemed “undesirable predators” led to the cats’ extermination in the east and Midwest.

Things started to turn around for the cougar in the 1960s and 70s when, one by one, the bounties were rescinded and states made the animals a managed-game species. Today they are classified as game species in most states and a “specially protected mammal” in California. This allowed their populations first to grow and then to expand their territories.

Cougars are generalist predators, so LaRue says they can select any habitat with enough prey. They have also been shown to walk hundreds of kilometers in search of new habitat. “They have no problem traveling through cornfields or prairies for long distances if they have to,” she says. But cornfields and prairies aren’t suitable habitat for the cougars to settle in. She says they require forest cover, rugged terrain and dispersal corridors (typically rivers) that allow easy migration for both the cats and their prey.

Mountain Lions are very cool animals. So like our pets but with a size that means they can kill us, if they want. They are not much risk to us though. Occasionally their are attacks (now that the numbers of cougars are growing) but an extremely small number.

Data from the city of Boulder, Colorado:

There has been an average of 0.2 annual human deaths in all of North America from mountain lions between 1900 and 2007. This number is very low compared to annual deaths from black widow spiders (1.4 between 1950-1989), domestic dogs (16 between 1979-1998) and car crashes (45,000 between 1980-2005).

Related: Mountain Lion Foundation timelineBackyard Wildlife: Mountain LionJaguars Back in the Southwest USA
(2006)
Big Cats in America (2004)Snow Leopard Playing in the Snow in Ohio

Friday Fun: Kitten and Bunny

Just some fun for your Friday. Enjoy.

Related: Monkey and Kitten PlayingBunny and Kittens: Friday Cat FunCat and Owl Playing

Video of Kittens Being Rescued by Their Mother

Repost of this fun cat video and a reminder to thank your mother for all the times she saved you from your version of the slide. Have a happy friday. Maybe you should forward this video to your Mom with a note of thanks and make it a happy one for her too.

Related: Housecat Adopts Bobcat KittensMother cat with bunnies and kittensCat playing with ball you control with your smart phoneNaturally Curious Children

Backyard Wildlife: Mountain Lion

Sadly this isn’t my backyard. I would love to see a mountain lion like this. So close. A real wild mountain lion. And I am safe.

Related: Backyard Wildlife: BearsBackyard Wildlife: HawkBackyard Wildlife: Great Spreadwing Damselfly

  • Recent Comments:

    • Anonymous: Amazing and confusing at the same time to see a cat skateboarding, and being able to jump off of...
    • Patrick Hollingworth: I do agree. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I have read once that curiosity can...
    • syed ahad: I have a horse.I think your article is very useful for me. thanks for your article
    • Chem: I take pride in studying in chemical engineering
    • Michael: This is a truly beautiful design idea: simple, functional, and useful. I had’nt heard of the...
    • Michael: I love projects like this but I can’t imagine that the wind turbine was a justifiable...
    • xay dung dan dung: Science develops, more people to enjoy the novelty. Sometimes life around us there are...
    • Anonymous: The Link the Feynman videos seems to be working both with IE and FF, provided you have the...
  • Recent Trackbacks:

  • Links